Archive | May 7, 2015

Character Developments

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Even though it is a bit early to post, I wanted to go ahead and blog on a topic I find very important when I read and write. Sometimes it may seem so minor because the plot is so dramatic, but I feel like this is the most important part of any writing ever.
First of all, let’s narrow down what character development is. A character is represented by use of traits, personality, and philosophy, which is why they are called ‘characters.’ Many characters, such as Aslan in C.S. Lewis’ Narnia and the One Ring in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, represent undeniable characteristics and meanings. Not all characters posses an underlying theme, but sometimes they can be found.
Character development, however, not only uses the concept of qualities, but it goes from the bottom up or vice versa. A character who seems aloof and weak in the beginning may end up becoming the most brave person in the story ( Such as Rory Williams from Doctor Who.) or perhaps a character might be relatively good but quickly turns evil because of a change of their own philosophy. Ideas and philosophy are ideal in characters because they have to be individuals, like humans.

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A character sheet like this is what I often use before the development of the book. Of course, everyone has their own style. My processes usually include making a character on the sheet first, getting a grasp of what kind of person my character is, and them I dive into the plot. The plots and characters will often mesh once you get to a certain point of a book.
Characters that are too perfect are called Mary Sues. Keep careful watch of these folks; oftentimes, they will lead your book down the path of doom that could turn into a place of no hope if not noticed soon enough. It us possible to correct this, but it must be done to a point of where the story makes sense
And that, my friend, is the basics of character developments. Not all stories are made the same, and each forms our character.
Have a wonderful week!